Set your location
ACT
NSW
NT
QLD
SA
TAS
VIC
WA
Clear Selection

Support Services

Cancer Nurses

Registered Nurses with extensive knowledge and experience in the oncology field

Cancer Nurses
this service is currently available in:
ACT
NSW
NT
QLD
SA
TAS
VIC
WA

Cancer (oncology) nurses look after people who are diagnosed with cancer. These nurses will administer medication, provide care and offer information and support throughout treatment.

There are several types of nurses you may see during treatment breast care nurses, stomal therapy nurses and palliative care nurses as well as cancer support nurses.

Cancer Council does not provide nursing services but we can assist you in finding the care you need. Call 13 11 20 for more information.

Breast Care Nurse

The Breast Care Nurse is a registered nurse who has undertaken specialist training in breast cancer nursing and is part of the multidisciplinary health care team. 

Who can access the services of a Breast Care Nurse?

Any person diagnosed with breast cancer, as well as their family or colleagues who need information and support. You can talk to your health care team about a referral to a Breast Care Nurse or you may be able to refer yourself to a service.

Access to information after a breast cancer diagnosis

There are many different types of breast cancer and therefore different treatment options. After a diagnosis of breast cancer, finding accurate information can be difficult and confusing.

Preparing for, and undergoing treatment, may be a challenging experience. The Breast Care Nurse can provide you with information and practical advice before, during and after treatment.

If you are required to travel for treatment, the Breast Care Nurse can provide you with information about the treatment centre you will be attending.

Write down questions as they come to mind and take the list along to the next appointment with your doctor or health professional.

How the Breast Care Nurse can help

  • Provide a range of information about breast cancer.
  • Answer questions about breast cancer, surgery, treatment and related issues. 
  • Attend doctor's appointments with you.
  • Provide continuity of care.
  • Liaise with other members of the multidisciplinary health care team.
  • Practical support.
  • Referral to other services.
  • Information about prostheses and when to be fitted.
  • Qualified fitting of prostheses.
  • Information about reconstruction.
  • Look Good Feel Better workshop referrals.
  • Information about breast cancer peer support group meetings.
  • Wig hire, turbans and advice about hair loss.
  • Advocacy.

Peer support

Volunteers are available to give one-on-one peer support. Cancer Connect is a free and confidential telephone peer support service that connects you with a specially trained volunteer who has had a similar breast cancer experience.

For more information contact Cancer Council 13 11 20.

Stomal Therapy Nurse

A stoma is a surgically created opening in the abdomen that allows faeces to leave the body. You may have a stoma as part of treatment for bowel or bladder cancer and it may be temporary or permanent.

How to access a Stomal Therapy Nurse

Your surgeon may refer you to a Stomal Therapy Nurse before surgery if there is a chance you will need a stoma.

How the Stomal Therapy Nurse can help

Having a stoma, whether it is temporary or permanent means many changes in a person’s life and can take some getting used to. A Stomal Therapy Nurse is a registered nurse with specialised training in stoma care who can help you with living with a stoma. 

  • Your nurse will talk about the best place for your stoma to be located and answer questions about your surgery and recovery.
  • The Stomal Therapy Nurse can give you information about adjusting to life with a stoma.

Further assistance

If you wish, the Stomal Therapy Nurse can also sign you up to a stoma (ostomy) association where, for a small annual membership fee, you can get free stoma appliances and products. For more information go to the Australian Council of Stoma Associations.

You can call Cancer Council 13 11 20 to find out more about Stomal Therapy Nurses and living with a stoma.

Palliative Care Nurse

Palliative care is aimed at helping people with a progressive, life-limiting illness to maintain good quality of life. Palliative care helps people live as fully and comfortably as possible. You may see a range of health professionals if you are undergoing palliative treatment, including Palliative Care Nurses.

How a Palliative Care Nurse can help

A Palliative Care Nurse may work for a hospital, community nursing services, specialist palliative care service or a residential aged care facility. Their role may include:

  • Pain management and administering medications.
  • Managing equipment.
  • Monitoring patients and providing them with personal care.
  • Advocating for patients and their families.
  • Providing emotional and psychological support.

For further information on palliative care treatment and Palliative Care Nurses call Cancer Council 13 11 20.

Cancer Support Nurses

Cancer Support Nurses are Registered Nurses who have extensive knowledge and experience in the oncology field.

Cancer Support Nurses may also be referred to as Cancer Nurse Specialists, Cancer Nurse Care Coordinators or simply Cancer Care Coordinators.

Who can access the services of a Cancer Support Nurse?

Any person diagnosed with cancer, as well as carers and family who need information and support.

Access to information after a cancer diagnosis

There are many different types of cancer and therefore different treatment options. After a diagnosis of cancer, finding accurate information can be difficult and confusing. Preparing for, and undergoing treatment may be a challenging experience. Cancer Support Nurses can provide you with information and practical advice before, during and after your treatment.

How Cancer Support Nurses can help

  • Provide information and resources about cancer and treatment options.
  • Provide emotional support and discuss self-care options.
  • Provide practical support.
  • Provide continuity of care.
  • Liaise with other members of the multidisciplinary health care team.
  • Attend doctor's appointments with you.
  • Provide information about cancer support group meetings.
  • Look Good Feel Better workshop referrals.
  • Wigs, turbans and advice about hair loss.
  • Advocacy.
  • Referral to other services .

Peer support

Trained volunteers are able to give you one on one peer support. Cancer Connect is a free and confidential telephone peer support service that connects you with a specially trained volunteer who has had a similar cancer experience.

For more information contact Cancer Council 13 11 20.

Explore all support services